Niche Marketing continues to change

The genius of Staples way back when was this: It identified a niche that needed to be served. 
 That was providing office supplies for small business. 
 The timing was perfect. 
Niche Rich Marketing
 Corporate America was downsizing middle management. Those middle-aged professionals 
had no choice but to set up their own businesses.  
 Now niche marketing is considered a must-do. Not just a smart strategy.
 
 Even in public relations, it's predicted that the general agency will go the way 
of the department store. Instead each public relations firm will serve a distinct 
niche such as healthcare or tech.  

Here  is my article published on Odwyerpr.com about that. 
 All that sounds good, right. In the legal sector, niche firms such as 
Sanford Heisler Sharp, which handles employment discrimination, are thriving.
 
 The U.S. auto industry is moving toward focusing on only one niche: larger vehicles 
such as SUVs and pickups.  Drudge Report's niche is conservative politics.  
 The problem is: Identifying which niche will scale for your business.
 
 That isn't as easy as sitting down and analyzing where growth is. Usually the process 
is a frustrating one of actually investing real resources, especially time, in testing 
out which could catch fire.
  Too, Much
 During the past 18 months that was my mission. The content-creation category had become 
increasingly glutted. Not only were there more and more professionals chasing the same 
business. The glut drove down compensation. 

Also, the buyers' market could result in cruel or at least crude treatment by those 
contracting out assignments. Among what I did in searching for a niche is what you 
might refer to as A/B testing.
 
The ranged from blockchain technology to being a paid influencer. There was some success. 
But not enough to continue those particular experiments. However, those ventures did bring 
in income at the time. They still are. 
Career-in-Blockchain-Technology-Opportunities-and-Challenges_Lead-Pic 
 Of course, that was discouraging. The only way to keep up trying out niches was to have 
no expectations. Hope was a mindset I couldn't afford. 
 Since I had no expectations it wasn't a big deal to test out my side business in career 
coaching as a formal profit center. Had I had high hopes I wouldn't have gone in that direction. 
 I niched that down further to the market segment of the over-50. 

That proved out to be what got things moving. Actually, things took off in an unexpected way. 
Positioning and packaging myself as a coach whose mission was to outsmart  ageism  
brought in content-creation assignments from atypical market segments. 

They included those needing a professional with deep empathy, startups in services and 
products for the aging, and online instruction vendors.  Currently, I have more assignments 
for strategically planning and producing content than for coaching per se.
  
 Among the tools I leveraged to promote the niche was writing and distributing free ebooks 
related to the niche. That branded me as serving the public interest. Trust immediately 
was established. 

Here is one such book Download Over50OutsmartingYourComfortZone.    
Another tactic was figuring out how to get articles published in third-part media. Of course, 
that has more influence than putting material on one's own digital platforms. Once those were 
published, I re purposed them on all my sites.
   
 A third was allowing the market to gel on its own. A mistake would have been to establish 
- prematurely - its parameters. Of course, the challenge now is to manage the momentum. 
Like everything else in business, niche marketing continues to mutate.
 Listening
Takeaway: Set up ways you can listen to the market. Listening only to yourself and the 
experts will limit you. Coaching, auditing, lecturing, and writing/ghostwriting thought 
leadership content on ageism.
e-book cover niche rich marketing

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